BY CAR TO NORWAY? HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF

There are places where the main attraction is not monuments and urban architecture, but a natural landscape. Places where it is most enjoyable to admire nature. That is what Norway is like. The mode of transport remains a problem, after all, we will not get everywhere by public transport. And if so… to go to Norway by car?

You need to be well prepared before you can set off on the road. Depending on which region of Poland we are going to start from, it may take from one to two days. This is a lot, which is why it is necessary to organize rest points, meals, and overnight stays. It is worth having an emergency supply of food and water, as well as blankets and sleeping bags, which we cover in case of an unforeseen overnight stay.

How do I get to Norway?

To get to Norway you need to take a ferry. There are several possibilities. We can board a ferry in Poland (Świnoujście, Szczecin, Gdynia) and get there to Sweden. Then we will travel by car to Norway, which may be an additional advantage – we will visit two Scandinavian countries. An alternative is to cross Germany and Denmark and travel from the Danish port of Hirtshals to Norway. What if we don’t want to use the ferry? We can take the E20 to Sweden on the way to the straits. It should be borne in mind, however, that the purely land-based road is several hundred kilometers longer.

Before you enter Norway, you should register with Autopass. It allows for automatic charging of toll roads, bridges, and tunnels based on the reading of license plates. Entry to certain cities (e.g. Trondheim, Bergen or Oslo) is also subject to a fee. You pay for your car with your passengers and the prices are up to several dozen Norwegian kroner. We must spend additional money on ferry crossings in the vicinity of fjords.

What to keep in mind?

First of all, fuel condition monitoring. In many places, the stations are quite infrequent, every few dozen kilometers, so it is good to have an emergency stock. The owners of LPG cars may have trouble, because there are not many gas filling stations in Norway – about 100, and it is good to have a full tank of gasoline in your mouth. By the way, how is the “petrol station” in Norwegian? Remember easily: bensinstasjon.

This is not the end of what needs to be borne in mind. Norway, like us, has a 24-hour dipped-beam headlamp requirement. Also, remind passengers to wear their seatbelts as necessary. As far as the equipment of the vehicle is concerned, a first aid kit, a fire extinguisher, a reflective jacket and a warning triangle are required. In winter it is worth having chains that we can quickly put on the tires. Of course, it goes without saying that winter tires and the brake system must be at their best in terms of performance. The road infrastructure in Norway is very good, but when you travel in less frequented areas, you will certainly find yourself on narrow, winding and less snow-covered roads. Animals, on the other hand, are a major threat. Particular care should be taken in rural areas, as a flock of sheep or reindeer can easily be found along the way.

Stay patient and masterful

A trip to Norway also requires a lot of patience and control from us. Why? The reason for this is the extremely strict system of speeding penalties. An overrun of just 25 km/h can result in a fine of as much as NOK 7,800. Nor should it be forgotten that there is no acceptable tolerance. It is enough to exceed the speed by 1 km/h in order to face a penalty. Equally high fines are, of course, other road traffic offenses, so it is worth considering. The comfort, however, is high – high road safety. It is not, to put it bluntly, random.

A car trip to Norway is undoubtedly an interesting and unique adventure. However, it lasts several or even several dozen hours, so it requires the strength of character and proper preparation. Take care of all the details before you leave and prepare contingency plans. Don’t you want to spoil your experience? Without any worries, even in the case of the most detailed plan, they will not be missing anyway. Anyone who has ever been a car in Norway can make sure they do so.

 

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